Publications Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane houses the foremost public collection of contemporary art in Ireland; the gallery also has a dynamic temporary exhibitions programme often encompassing the permanent collection. http://www.hughlane.ie/bacon-publication 2017-12-14T20:51:17+00:00 Point Blank Francis Bacon Studio 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 http://www.hughlane.ie/bacon-publications/227-francis-bacons-studio <p>In <em>Francis Bacon's Studio</em>, Margarita Cappock provides the first in-depth study of the studio, selecting key elements from the dense mass of objects Bacon accumulated and placing them succinctly within the context of the artist's life and practice.</p> <p>Profusely illustrated with unique material that has never previously been published<em>, Francis Bacon's Studio </em>makes an important contribution to Bacon studies, especially in relation to the last three decades of the artist's career. Drawing on artefacts that resonate with the energy of Bacon's work, this book offers unprecedented insights into the sources, inspiration and working methods of one of the giants of modern art.</p> <p>In <em>Francis Bacon's Studio</em>, Margarita Cappock provides the first in-depth study of the studio, selecting key elements from the dense mass of objects Bacon accumulated and placing them succinctly within the context of the artist's life and practice.</p> <p>Profusely illustrated with unique material that has never previously been published<em>, Francis Bacon's Studio </em>makes an important contribution to Bacon studies, especially in relation to the last three decades of the artist's career. Drawing on artefacts that resonate with the energy of Bacon's work, this book offers unprecedented insights into the sources, inspiration and working methods of one of the giants of modern art.</p> Francis Bacon Studio at the Hugh Lane 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 http://www.hughlane.ie/bacon-publications/228-francis-bacons-studio-at-the-hugh-lane <p>An artist's studio is a fascinating place to visit and Francis Bacon's studio at 7, Reece Mews was no exception. It became a legendary space during the artist's long and successful career. Situated on a quite cobbled lane in South Kensington, London, this modest mews house was his home for the last thirty years of his life. He moved in during the autumn of 1961 and lived there until his death in 1992. During this period he produced some of his finest paintings and enjoyed international recognition as one of the greatest painters of the 20th century.</p> <p>An artist's studio is a fascinating place to visit and Francis Bacon's studio at 7, Reece Mews was no exception. It became a legendary space during the artist's long and successful career. Situated on a quite cobbled lane in South Kensington, London, this modest mews house was his home for the last thirty years of his life. He moved in during the autumn of 1961 and lived there until his death in 1992. During this period he produced some of his finest paintings and enjoyed international recognition as one of the greatest painters of the 20th century.</p> Francis Bacon in Dublin 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 http://www.hughlane.ie/bacon-publications/229-francis-bacon-in-dublin <p>Published in June 2000 to celebrate the Hugh Lane Gallery's acquisition of Francis Bacon's studio, donated by his heir John Edwards, this volume accompanied the first exhibition of Bacon's paintings to be held in his native city for four decades. Curated by David Sylvester, the internationally renowned critic and curator, and Bacon's close friend for more than forty years, the exhibition surveyed the whole of the artist's career from the early 1930s through to the late 1980s. The paintings in the show, all of which are reproduced in full colour, include some of his most important and finest works, and several from the Estate of Francis Bacon which had never before been exhibited in a public gallery. Sylvester's notes to the plates present a concise account of Bacon's artistic development, highlighting the central themes, motifs and techniques that evolve or remained constant throughout his career. In addition, accompanying texts by Grey Gowrie, Louis le Brocquy, Anthony Cronin and Paul Durcan, all of whom knew Bacon personally, provide fascinating insights into the artist's life, work and personality.</p> <p>Published in June 2000 to celebrate the Hugh Lane Gallery's acquisition of Francis Bacon's studio, donated by his heir John Edwards, this volume accompanied the first exhibition of Bacon's paintings to be held in his native city for four decades. Curated by David Sylvester, the internationally renowned critic and curator, and Bacon's close friend for more than forty years, the exhibition surveyed the whole of the artist's career from the early 1930s through to the late 1980s. The paintings in the show, all of which are reproduced in full colour, include some of his most important and finest works, and several from the Estate of Francis Bacon which had never before been exhibited in a public gallery. Sylvester's notes to the plates present a concise account of Bacon's artistic development, highlighting the central themes, motifs and techniques that evolve or remained constant throughout his career. In addition, accompanying texts by Grey Gowrie, Louis le Brocquy, Anthony Cronin and Paul Durcan, all of whom knew Bacon personally, provide fascinating insights into the artist's life, work and personality.</p> Francis Bacon: A Terrible Beauty 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 2001-12-03T00:00:00+00:00 http://www.hughlane.ie/bacon-publications/230-francis-bacon-a-terrible-beauty <p>Published by Steidl on the occasion of the exhibition, <em>Francis Bacon: A Terrible Beauty</em>, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, 28 October 2009 - 7 March 2010. Includes essays by the co-curators, Barbara Dawson and Martin Harrison, along with texts by Rebecca Daniels, Marcel Finke, Jessica O'Donnell, Joanna Shepard, and Logan Sisley.</p> <p>Published by Steidl on the occasion of the exhibition, <em>Francis Bacon: A Terrible Beauty</em>, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, 28 October 2009 - 7 March 2010. Includes essays by the co-curators, Barbara Dawson and Martin Harrison, along with texts by Rebecca Daniels, Marcel Finke, Jessica O'Donnell, Joanna Shepard, and Logan Sisley.</p>