Artists' Takeover: Corban Walker

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What am I thinking about at the time of writing? I’m in West Cork at a family gathering in the house my father designed almost 50 years ago. It is a very special place, that immediately disarms you on arrival, to sit and look at nature, ever changing, for hours on end. This gable wall is a great transformer in enabling exactly that.

Corban Walker

Image creditGable Wall by Corban Walker

 

Reading

 

Colum McCann, Apeirogon I’m not a great reader, I never learnt how to immerse myself into it, so this novel is even more challenging for me but it is a very interesting read about both sides of a very complex subject; Palestine.

 

Listening to

Iarla Ó Lionáird

I heard an interview with Iarla Ó Lionáird recently on the radio and was completely blown away by his voice again Here is a link of him with Steve Cooney on TV recently. 
View here



An Essay

Lee Ufan wrote this towards the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic. It is spot on.

Read here



A Poem

By Leah Poole Osowski

I met Leah Poole Osowski when I was lecturing at an Art Residency Program at the Vermont Studio Centre in the US in 2018. She was one of the residents there and wrote this poem about my work. It’s the only time a Poet has written about my art practice.

In Glass We’re Rim, Explicit
~after Corban Walker

The house made of gone, mostly glass, L-shaped to gaze

across diagonals but move indoors at right angles, cliff-like, minimal.

To use the edges of a material as the main surface,

see the stacking, their raw-cut soda-lime silica.

Approach and retreat,

the counter-balance.

As much about the light as the object, their interplay,

their green to blue, the color intensifying with depth.

It wants you face-first falling through floors as years de-escalating.

It wants you refracted, angled away from initial intent.

Blown borosilicate. Skylight blind. Cubed. Assembled. Congregate in grid.

The transparence of your immediacy.


The exact middle of the day in an inverted room.


It was also the first time I ever saw windswept icicles



Image CreditIcicles in Vermont by Corban Walker

From the Hugh Lane Collection

Cattle by Oisín Kelly

Image: Cattle (1970) by Oisín Kelly

Berlin Suite I (12/75) by Cecil King

 



Image: Berlin Suite I (12/75) by Cecil King

Both of these artists were frequent visitors to our home in the 1970’s and I remember them distinctly, each in their unique presence. Oisín Kelly was a master sculptor who could adapt to any scale or environment, from this beautifully hand carved small wooden sculpture, to “The Children of Lir” a monumental sculpture installed across the street from the Hugh Lane Gallery in the Garden of Remembrance. (It is astonishing that the Hugh Lane only has two small pieces of Kelly’s work in their collection.) Cecil King was a brilliant minimalist artist, collector and curator. I remember him being in the house, impeccably suited at committee meetings, chain smoking while sharing his intellect in a manner quite similar to his paintings; concise, hard edged and calculated.

About the Artist

Corban Walker (b. 1967, Dublin, Ireland) gained recognition for his installations, sculptures, and drawings that relate to perceptions of scale and architectural constructs. His local, cultural, and specific philosophies of scale are fundamental to how he defines and develops his work, creating new means for viewers to interact and navigate their surroundings.
Walker represented Ireland at the 54th Venice International Art Biennale in 2011. He received the Pollock Krasner Award in 2015
Corban spent 12 years based in New York, where he was represented by Pace Gallery. Since his return to Europe in 2017, he has worked with many cultural institutions that have exhibited his installations across the continent. The Crawford Art Gallery in Cork will present a survey of his work, in 2021.
Instagram @corban_walker

 

What am I thinking about at the time of writing? I’m in West Cork at a family gathering in the house my father designed almost 50 years ago. It is a very special place, that immediately disarms you on arrival, to sit and look at nature, ever changing, for hours on end. This gable wall is a great transformer in enabling exactly that.