Past Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane houses the foremost public collection of contemporary art in Ireland; the gallery also has a dynamic temporary exhibitions programme often encompassing the permanent collection. http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections Thu, 14 Dec 2017 20:46:39 +0000 Point Blank en-gb Ancient Ground by Willie Doherty http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1639-ancientground http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1639-ancientground Ancient Ground by Willie Doherty

On view in Gallery 10

Much of Doherty's work has been shaped by his experiences growing up in a society deeply divided by political and religious conflict and of being forced to deal with feelings of oppression and fear. His work explores the distortions that inevitably occur in the representation of reality. Many of Doherty's photographs, video and film installations can be read as comments on the multiplicity of meanings hidden beneath the supposed objectivity of an image. Ancient Ground was filmed in the peat bogs of County Donegal. In this film, the landscape is scarred by absence rather than presence. Bogs, positioned on the margins of society, have long served as sites for the disposal of bodies and the concealment of crime. Here, elusive traces of destruction and the memories of human trauma remain embedded in the landscape.

HD video, 8 mins, edition 3/3.

Permanent loan to Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane.

Collection Irish Museum of Modern Art, Heritage Gift, 2014

 

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info.hughlane@dublincity.ie (General Enquiries) Mon, 14 Nov 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Mon, 14 Nov 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 06 Aug 2017 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/ancient ground_35 cropped.jpg
Francis Bacon Paintings http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1560-frabcusbaconpaintings http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1560-frabcusbaconpaintings On view in the Francis Bacon display cases


Reproductions of Francis Bacon’s own paintings lined the walls of his kitchen and studio at 7 Reece Mews, South Kensington, London. These reproductions of his work including leaves torn from books, magazines and catalogues, as well as photographs taken by Prudence Cuming, were found among the thousands of items in his studio.

As well as offering the opportunity for continuously looking at previous compositions and subjects as sources of inspiration, Bacon also on occasion over-painted or manipulated these reproductions of his own finished paintings as another way of exploring and developing new compositional and pictorial ideas in his work. As was common with sources and images of particular interest to the artist, on a number of occasions multiples of the same painting were found in his studio.

As the recently published catalogue raisonné of Francis Bacon has revealed, Bacon made over 580 paintings during the course of his artistic career. On view here are a number of images of Bacon’s work found in his studio. The subjects include Bacon’s friend and sole heir John Edwards, his friend Isabel Rawsthorne, the wildlife photographer and writer Peter Beard and Bacon’s lover George Dyer.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Thu, 21 Jul 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Mon, 28 Nov 2016 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/f1-11cropped.jpg
High Treason: Roger Casement http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1441-hightreasonrogercasement2016 http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1441-hightreasonrogercasement2016 High Treason: Roger Casement


Until 2 October 2016


Marking the 2016 Easter Rising commemorations, Sir John Lavery’s monumental painting, High Treason: The Appeal of Roger Casement, The Court of Criminal Appeal, 17 and 18 July 1916 moves from Kings Inns where it has been on loan from the UK Government Art Collection since 1951 to be the centrepiece of this historic exhibition in 2016. This painting depicts the last day of Roger Casement’s appeal against the sentence of death for treason before five judges of the Court of Criminal Appeal in London. Lavery's painting is one of the most significant visual accounts of the events surrounding the 1916 Rising.

Roger Casement, the highly regarded humanitarian, knighted for his steadfast and unwavering dedication to highlighting the atrocities in the Putumayo region of South America, and prior to that in the Congo in Africa, is shown in the very place where he would deliver his celebrated Speech from the Dock, a speech which is now regarded as one of the greatest orations of all time. Portraits of a number of the legal personalities involved in the Trial and Appeal including judges Lord Chief Justice Sir Rufus Isaacs who presided over the Trial and Sir Charles John Darling who presided over the Appeal as well as the prosecuting council Attorney General Sir Frederick Smith later Lord Birkenhead are on loan from the National Portrait Gallery, London. There are also loans from the National Gallery of Ireland and the artist Elizabeth Magill as well as archival images from the collection of the National Library of Ireland.

Among other works drawn from the Hugh Lane’s own collection are Lavery’s portrait of George Gavan Duffy, who with Sergeant Sullivan represented Roger Casement, and Rodin’s bust of George Bernard Shaw. Shaw supported Casement and advised him ‘to be eloquent about his right to take up arms for the independence of his country.’ The portrait by William Rothenstein of Casement’s great friend Alice Stopford Green is also exhibited. With Casement, Stopford Green was an anti-Imperialist activist who advocated reform at home and abroad in favour of the dispossessed and the exploited. Lavery's fascinating preparatory study of the Appeal which the artist presented to this Gallery in 1935 is also on view.

Curated by Jessica O'Donnell.

An illustrated publication High Treason: Roger Casement (ed.) Jessica O'Donnell accompanies the exhibition with contributions by Mr Justice Donal O’Donnell, Sinéad McCoole, Angus Mitchell, Chris Clarke, Charles Esche, Tacita Dean and Elizabeth Magill.

For further information please contact: Jessica O’Donnell, Collections Curator, jodonnell.hughlane@dublincity.ie, 01 222 5560


The award winning RTE documentary The Ghost of Roger Casement (2002) is being screened in gallery 11. (Written and Directed by Alan Gilsenan and Produced by John Murray and Kim Bartley). Duration: 90 mins.

High Treason: Roger Casement is kindly supported by the Bank of Ireland.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Thu, 10 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 10 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 02 Oct 2016 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/high treason by john laverycropped.jpg
Francis Bacon: The Figure in Motion http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1371-francisbaconsfigureinmotion http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1371-francisbaconsfigureinmotion Francis Bacon: The Figure in Motion

On view in the display cases of the Francis Bacon Studio

Curated by Jessica O'Donnell

The theme of the human figure in motion was one which greatly interested Francis Bacon and it was explored by him in many of his paintings. Bacon chose not to paint from life but rather to take inspiration from the vast range of diverse visual sources he gathered around him in his studio. Photographs of the human figure in motion had the potential to show bodies in awkward positions or to be captured in a fragmented way. Bacon would often then re-contextualise these images of the human form in his figurative compositions. The imagery of Eadweard Muybridge, the pioneering nineteenth century photographer who undertook a series of photographs showing people and animals in different stages of movement, was specifically referenced by Bacon in his painting. About this Bacon said: ‘Actually, Michelangelo and Muybridge are mixed up in my mind together, and so I perhaps could learn about positions from Muybridge and learn about the ampleness, the grandeur of form from Michelangelo.’


Bacon extended this interest in how the human figure moved to include sources derived from illustrated publications, magazines and newspapers showing dancers, boxers, tennis players and cricketers. That these loose leaf images were torn out or mounted on card by Bacon further highlights their importance to the artist. A detail of Studies From the Human Body (1973) included in this display is one such example where the intertwined forms and distinct corporeal shadows evident in many of the images of the human figure in motion found among the items in his studio have inspired Bacon in his painting.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 15 Jul 2015 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 15 Jul 2015 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 20 Jul 2016 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/f16-68ver cropped.jpg
Francis Bacon And The Art Of The Past http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1255-francis-bacon-new-display-dec-2014 http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1255-francis-bacon-new-display-dec-2014 NEW DISPLAY IN FRANCIS BACON’S STUDIO

FRANCIS BACON AND THE ART OF THE PAST

16 December 2014 – 16 March 2015

Curated by Dr. Margarita Cappock

This display of items from Francis Bacon’s Studio reflect the artist’s professed admiration for the work of other artists such as Michelangelo, Velázquez, Rembrandt, Ingres, Degas, Seurat, Rodin, Van Gogh, Picasso and Giacometti.  Two of Bacon’s major series of paintings were based on reproductions of the work of other artists, namely Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1650) and Van Gogh’s The Painter on the Route to Tarascon (1888).  His knowledge of both paintings was entirely through reproductions.  Bacon hoarded more books in his studio on Michelangelo than on any other artist. He particularly admired Michelangelo’s drawings.  The studio also contained an impressive number of books and book leaves on Egyptian art and civilisation.  Bacon believed that the achievement of Egyptian sculpture had scarcely been surpassed and even went so far as to say, “I think perhaps that the greatest images that man has made so far have been sculpture. I’m thinking of some of the great Egyptian sculpture, of course, and Greek sculpture too.”

A selection of similar material from Bacon’s Studio Archive at Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane is currently on loan to a major exhibition at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia (7 December 2014 – 8 March 2015).  The exhibition, entitled Francis Bacon and the Art of the Past, is the first exhibition of Bacon’s work in Russia since 1988 and presents twenty paintings by Bacon placed in the context of masterpieces from the State Hermitage collection: Egyptian mummy masks, Roman and Renaissance sculpture, including Michelangelo’s Crouching Boy, and a number of the museum’s most famous works including portraits by Rembrandt and Velázquez. It also includes works by Ingres, Matisse, Van Gogh and Degas’s pastel of a woman after her toilette.   The selection of material from the Hugh Lane forms a bridge between the old and the new, the real and the reproduction and offers a unique opportunity to explore Bacon’s relationship with his rich artistic heritage.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 16 Dec 2014 15:00:00 +0000 Tue, 16 Dec 2014 15:00:00 +0000 Mon, 16 Mar 2015 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/bacon image cropped for website.jpg
Francis Bacon And The Art Of The Past http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/131-francis-bacon-and-the-art-of-the-past http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/131-francis-bacon-and-the-art-of-the-past NEW DISPLAY IN FRANCIS BACON’S STUDIO

FRANCIS BACON AND THE ART OF THE PAST

16 December 2014 – 16 March 2015

Curated by Dr. Margarita Cappock

This display of items from Francis Bacon’s Studio reflects the artist’s professed admiration for the work of other artists such as Michelangelo, Velázquez, Rembrandt, Ingres, Degas, Seurat, Rodin, Van Gogh, Picasso and Giacometti.  Two of Bacon’s major series of paintings were based on reproductions of the work of other artists, namely Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1650) and Van Gogh’s The Painter on the Route to Tarascon (1888).  His knowledge of both paintings was entirely through reproductions.  Bacon hoarded more books in his studio on Michelangelo than on any other artist. He particularly admired Michelangelo’s drawings.  The studio also contained an impressive number of books and book leaves on Egyptian art and civilisation.  Bacon believed that the achievement of Egyptian sculpture had scarcely been surpassed and even went so far as to say, “I think perhaps that the greatest images that man has made so far have been sculpture. I’m thinking of some of the great Egyptian sculpture, of course, and Greek sculpture too.”

A selection of similar material from Bacon’s Studio Archive at Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane is currently on loan to a major exhibition at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia (7 December 2014 – 8 March 2015).  The exhibition, entitled Francis Bacon and the Art of the Past, is the first exhibition of Bacon’s work in Russia since 1988 and presents twenty paintings by Bacon placed in the context of masterpieces from the State Hermitage collection: Egyptian mummy masks, Roman and Renaissance sculpture, including Michelangelo’s Crouching Boy, and a number of the museum’s most famous works including portraits by Rembrandt and Velázquez. It also includes works by Ingres, Matisse, Van Gogh and Degas’s pastel of a woman after her toilette.   The selection of material from the Hugh Lane forms a bridge between the old and the new, the real and the reproduction and offers a unique opportunity to explore Bacon’s relationship with his rich artistic heritage.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Mon, 16 Mar 2015 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/bacon image cropped for website.jpg
Efforts and Ideals: Prints of the First World War http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1145-efforts-and-ideals-prints-of-the-first-world-war http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1145-efforts-and-ideals-prints-of-the-first-world-war 24 September 2014 – 22 February 2015

Curator: Dr. Margarita Cappock

In 1917 the British Ministry of Information commissioned several well-known British artists to produce a series of images on different aspects of the war effort.  The aim was to encourage a war-weary public and raise support for the war effort.  The images by various artists illustrate some of the changing attitudes at the time such as the role of women in the war, the industry of war and the casualties of war.  The lithographs were divided into “Efforts” with nine artists producing  six lithographs each on different aspects of the war effort, including Christopher Wynne Nevinson, William Rothenstein and Claude Shepperson.

A further twelve artists were commissioned to produce a single image representing the “Ideals” for which the war was fought.  These included, amongst others, Augustus John, Frank Brangwyn, George Clausen, Edmund Dulac, Charles Ricketts and Charles Shannon.  Many of these artists are also represented in the collection of the Hugh Lane Gallery.  All the lithographs, 66 in total, were produced in editions of 200 and the subscription price for a complete set was 100 guineas. The prospectus published on January 1, 1919 described the series as “a first attempt by a number of British artists, working in unison, to put on record some aspects of the activities called forth by the Great War, and Ideals by which those activities were inspired.” The prints were published by the Fine Art Society and produced under the direction of Ernest Jackson, himself a contributor to the “Ideals” series.

A fully illustrated catalogue with an introductory essay by Margarita Cappock and catalogue texts by Margarita Cappock, Jessica O'Donnell, Geoffrey Prendergast and Ruth Keating is on sale for €10. ISBN 978-1-901702-44-6 

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 24 Sep 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 24 Sep 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 22 Feb 2015 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/458_dulac_e.jpg
Francis Bacon's Library http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1147-francisbaconslibrary http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1147-francisbaconslibrary Francis Bacon’s Library

Over 570 books were found in Francis Bacon’s studio on subjects drawn from medicine, wildlife, cinema, literature, sport, cookery, languages and travel among other subjects. Many books on art historical subjects, as well as exhibition catalogues of Bacon’s own work and those of other artists, were found among the items in the studio. Like his commissioning photographs of friends which allowed him to paint at a distance from his subject, some of Bacon's most significant work was based on reproductions of work by other artists.

In addition to the books found in Bacon’s studio, in 2001 the Hugh Lane received a further generous donation of circa 670 books from the Estate of Francis Bacon. These books were originally located in the kitchen and bedroom of 7 Reece Mews and at Dale Farm in Suffolk, a property owned by the artist but which he rarely used. In a number of instances the paint accretions on several of the books and loose pages indicate that the artist referred to them while he was painting. The books on display here include classic works by authors such as Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Honoré de Balzac and Thomas Mann. A number of authors in Bacon’s library are represented by several books including Henry James, Wilkie Collins, Agatha Christie and Joseph Conrad revealing his particular enjoyment of their work. 
For further information please contact Jessica O'Donnell, Collections Curator or Margarita Cappock, Head of Collections. E. jodonnell.hughlane@dublincity.ie T. 01 2225560

 

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 25 Jun 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 25 Jun 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 30 Nov 2014 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/f108-78cropped.jpg
New Rehang http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1105-gallery-rehang http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1105-gallery-rehang New rehang

A new selection of works from the collection is currently on display in galleries 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18.  It includes works by Patrick Scott, Louis le Brocquy, Anne Madden, Brian O'Docherty, Patrick Hall, Patrick Graham, John Kindness, Gerard Byrne, William McKeown, Eithne Jordan and Fergus Martin.  It features new acquisitions including Eithne Jordan's Mansion I and William McKeown's The Lane and Connemara series of watercolours.

For further information please contact:
Dr. Margarita Cappock
Head of Collections and Deputy Director
+ 353 1 2225557
mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie

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info.hughlane@dublincity.ie (General Enquiries) Sun, 02 Mar 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 02 Mar 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 27 Apr 2014 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/1890_kindness_j.jpg
Francis Bacon and Conflict http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1038-francisbaconandconflict http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1038-francisbaconandconflict Francis Bacon and Conflict

A vast range of diverse source material was found in Francis Bacon’s studio. Many of these visual and written sources relate to war and conflict and include loose leaves torn from books and magazines. A selection of items related to this theme is currently on view in the display cases of the Francis Bacon studio. Bacon had grown up in Ireland during the time of the War of Independence (1919-21) and the Irish Civil War (1922-23). During the Second World War he volunteered to serve in the Civil Defence Corps, where his work involved black-out enforcement as well as assisting with first-aid and rescue at bomb sites. Responding to some people’s reaction to his work being disturbing, Bacon remarked that his work was no more disturbing than life itself.
The First and Second World Wars feature most frequently in the books and torn leaves related to war found among the items in Bacon’s studio, although other conflicts such as rebellion in Algeria and the Vietnam War were also among the subjects which interested Bacon. This fascination with the visual history of the twentieth century is also revealed by Bacon’s admiration for the book Il Mondo Cambia by Leo Longanesi (1949) which Bacon said contained some of his most significant pictorial stimuli. Other influential visual sources for Bacon included Picture Post, a photojournalism magazine which was phenomenally successful in Britain, and published between 1938 and 1957. Life Magazine and Paris Match were also significant sources for images of contemporary conflict. Robert Capa’s Images of War and Jorge Lewinski’s The Camera at War: War photography from 1848 to the Present Day are further indications of Bacon’s interest in vivid depictions of conflict. While a text might initially inform a photographic image, Bacon often freely combined diverse source images in one painting, thus re-contextualising them and freeing them from their original meaning and association. The spontaneous photographic images of the human figure in motion, where the figure is often shown distorted or fragmented because of extreme psychological and physical situations, had enormous potential to trigger figurative and compositional ideas for the artist.   Bacon said: ‘I feel ever so strongly that an artist must be nourished by his passions and his despairs. These things alter an artist whether for the good or the better or the worse. It must alter him. The feelings of desperation and unhappiness are more useful to an artist than the feeling of contentment, because desperation and unhappiness stretch your whole sensibility.’ Bacon did not flinch from exploring similarities between human and animal carcasses. Indeed one aspect of conflict to which Bacon returned repeatedly was physical brutality and among the items found in his studio were graphic images of massacres in Algeria leaving one in no doubt as to the horrific consequences of war.  Curated by Jessica O'Donnell.
For further information please contact Jessica O'Donnell, Collections Curator or Dr. Margarita Cappock, Deputy Director and Head of Collections. T. +353 1 2225557 E. mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 20 Nov 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 20 Nov 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 22 Jun 2014 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/f108-65.jpg
New Display of photographs of Lucian Freud from Francis Bacon’s Studio http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1036-lucianfreuddisplay http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/1036-lucianfreuddisplay A selection of sources for THREE STUDIES OF LUCIAN FREUD, 1969 by FRANCIS BACON

An exhibition of photographs of Lucian Freud will be on display in Francis Bacon’s Studio at the Hugh Lane from the 14th November

Francis Bacon had over sixty images of Lucian Freud in his studio, now in the collection of the Hugh Lane Gallery.  They include photographs, many of which were taken by John Deakin, of Freud seated on a bed, in his studio, reading a newspaper and standing in Fitzroy Square London.  Bacon physically manipulated these photographs by creasing and bending them, often distorting the image in the process.  This first photograph of Lucian Freud seated on a bed bears a direct and significant relationship to the centre panel of Three Studies of Lucian Freud, 1969 which achieved a record price at auction at Christie's, New York on the 12th November 2013. Torn and creased, Bacon has totally obscured one leg by bending the paper over it and securing it with paper clips.  The heavily paint stained image testifies to Bacon using this photograph in the process of painting.  Bacon also kept reproductions of Three Studies of Lucian Freud, 1969 in his studio.  The images of the centre and right hand panels seen here are torn from the book Francis Bacon Full Face and Profile (1983) by the artist’s friend, French philosopher and writer Michel Leiris. It is also interesting to note that Francis Bacon kept images of Lucian Freud’s Portrait of Francis Bacon, 1952 in his studio.  Heavily marked by paint accretions, this again reveals the artist’s practice of handling images while painting.

For further reading see:

Hugh Lane Exhibitions and Publications
Francis Bacon in Dublin Exhibition & Catalogue  
(Thames & Hudson ( 2000) Currently out of stock
Francis Bacon’s Studio by Margarita Cappock (Merrell, 2005)
Francis Bacon A Terrible Beauty Exhibition & Catalogue  (Steidl, 2009) Currently out of stock
See also
Francis Bacon e la condizione esistenziale nell'arte contemporanea CCC Strozzina Foundazione Palazzo Strozzi 2012-2013
Francis Bacon Five Decades Gallery of New South Wales 2012-2013

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Thu, 14 Nov 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 14 Nov 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 12 Jan 2014 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/f199-2dc.jpg
Francis Bacon: Photography Display http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/981-francis-bacon-photography-display http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/981-francis-bacon-photography-display
Photography played a central role in Francis Bacon’s practice and almost one quarter of the material found in his studio was of a photographic nature. Although Bacon’s relationship with the medium was somewhat conflicted study of the studio material has revealed photography to be a fertile source of inspiration for the artist. Bacon preferred to work from photographs as opposed to the live model as he found the physical presence of his sitters to be detrimental to the act of portrait painting, a process he described as ‘practising an injury’. Photography was a means to study the world in more detail and convey its essence more vividly. The images that Bacon amassed of friends and lovers became surrogates for the live model and crucial aids in the completion of his figurative works.

Although Bacon disliked his own physical appearance, he did not shirk from the camera’s gaze. Shown here are portraits by Michael Holtz, Jane Bown as well as an image by J. S Lewinski which shows Francis Bacon sitting in his Reece Mews studio with his painting 'Seated Figure, 1961' superimposed on the interior. When Bacon took charge of the lens himself he did so not with an eye to mastering the craft but rather as a means of preparatory planning for paintings. He staged shoots to provoke certain poses in anticipation of their transferral onto the canvas. This can be seen in an image of Peter Lacy standing beside a table in which the ordered backdrop and the formally posed stance are suggestive of an aid to a future composition as well as being indicative of Bacon’s visual taste. Bacon even embraced the humble photobooth as its inherent nature allowed for the adoption of varied expressions and postures as well as suggesting that portraiture should be a plural rather than a singular phenomenon. The strip-like aesthetic of the photobooth is reproduced in canvases such as 'Four Studies for a Self-Portrait 1967'.

Bacon’s host of images, much like his painted portraits, were often submitted to a series of deconstructions and mutations. Many were torn, folded, painted on and amalgamated as a means of preparatory planning or to tease out a specific composition. Even when images were literally falling apart they were frequently salvaged often by mounting on cardboard or by the addition of paperclips. By means of the cut and tear Bacon extended the photographic act of framing and editing and as imagery became altered the artist believed them to take on another significance.

Bacon accumulated many books on photography which covered a wide swath of subjects. These included milestones in the history of the medium such as 'Fox Talbot and the Invention of Photography' and Barthes’ seminal 'Camera Lucida'. Yet among the books that Bacon possessed on the subject of photography no other could claim to have had such a definitive influence on him as Eadweard Muybride’s 'The Human Figure in Motion'. Five copies were found in his studio and for Bacon they presented a veritable visual dictionary of human movement.

Bacon equally kept abreast with contemporary photography and as a testament to his photographic connoisseurship he even owned a copy of the short-lived British magazine 'Album' which only ran for twelve issues.

Display selected by Sarah Allen.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 04 Dec 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 04 Dec 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 15 Sep 2013 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/francis bacon photography display web image crop.jpg
Masterpiece: Ireland's Favourite Painting http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/621-irelands-favourite-painting http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/621-irelands-favourite-painting Over the last few months, RTÉ, Mike Murphy and Yellow Asylum Films have been visiting public galleries and public collections to get to know the many beautiful and important artworks that are on view, or held by these collections for the benefit of the people of Ireland. The team talked to curators and other experts and asked them to nominate their favourite paintings. They also asked the Irish public, through Today with Pat Kenny on RTÉ Radio 1 and rte.ie, to nominate their favourite painting(s) in any public collection of art in the country. From that, a long-list of 100 paintings was compiled.

In early February, a group of respected art professionals - Gemma Tipton, Peter Cherry, Oliver Dowling and Robert O'Byrne - chaired by Mike Murphy gathered to reduce this inspiring long-list to a shortlist of ten. They were joined in this by Ireland's First Lady, Sabina Higgins. The ten paintings can be viewed on the RTE website and the public can vote for their favourite. Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane has two paintings from the collection featured in the shortlist, Harry Clarke’s Stained Glass window, The Eve of St. Agnes, and Sean Scully’s Wall of Light Orange Yellow.

On Thursday 24th May, President Michael D. Higgins will reveal which of the ten paintings below has been voted Ireland's Favourite Painting by the Irish people.  Click on the link below to view the other paintings in the shortlist and vote for your favourite or click here to cast your vote.

http://www.rte.ie/tv/masterpiece/index.html

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 01 May 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 01 May 2012 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 24 May 2012 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/banner.jpg
The Visitor by Willie Doherty http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/133-the-visitor-by-willie-doherty http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/133-the-visitor-by-willie-doherty Gallery Eleven: Screening Room

Following on from the screening of Michael Hamburger by Tacita Dean, the Galley continues to showcase recent acquisitions in film and time based media. First exhibited at the Douglas Hyde Gallery in 2008, The Visitor was shot on location in Belfast in early 2008 and revisits some of Doherty's recurrent themes and preoccupations with place, landscape and memory. In this piece the camera moves between the trees of a small forest and scrutinises the surfaces of a block of flats. The Visitor features an enigmatic figure whose intentions and origins are unclear.

In addition a voiceover speculates about the role and nature of the unnamed visitor. The Visitor by Willie Doherty was acquired by Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane in 2010. At the Border II (Low Visibilty) by Willie Doherty also part of the Hugh Lane's permanent collection is on view in Gallery 12.

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info.hughlane@dublincity.ie (General Enquiries) Wed, 09 Mar 2011 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 09 Mar 2011 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 09 Mar 2011 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/mainitemimage_55_dohertyw.jpg
Francis Bacon: Art Books http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/300-francis-bacon-art-books http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/300-francis-bacon-art-books Over 470 books were found in Francis Bacon’s studio on subjects drawn from medicine, wildlife, cinema, literature and sport, among other subjects. Bacon saw himself as having been ‘ a late starter in everything..’ As he said: ‘… I think I was kind of delayed.’ Many books on art historical subjects, as well as exhibition catalogues of Bacon’s own work and those of other artists, were found among the items in the studio. Like his commissioning photographs of friends which allowed him to paint at a distance from his subject, some of Bacon's most significant work was based on reproductions of work by other artists. Bacon had a voracious visual appetite and looking at the work of artists such as Michelangelo or Rembrandt could suggest both the grandeur and fragmentation of form as well as the magnificent tension between the depiction of reality and painterly technique. Bacon declared to being 'obsessed' with Velazquez's masterpiece Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1650) and many reproductions of this and other works by Velazquez, Michelangelo and Rembrandt were found among the items in his studio. The depiction of a screaming mouth was the subject of fascination for Bacon and he considered Poussin’s painting The Massacre of the Innocents to be the best representation of the human cry in painting. The colour of the mouth intrigued Bacon and he aspired to paint the mouth ‘like Monet painted a sunset.’ A particular work of Van Gogh, The Painter on the Road to Tarascon (1888), also inspired painted variations on a theme by Bacon during the 1950s. Rather than aiming to tell a story in his painting he aimed for a ‘short hand of sensation’ and the vivid reality of Van Gogh’s painting, in particular his depiction of ‘the violence of the grass’ was just one of the ways Bacon was captivated by the painting. Bacon owned a copy of the French translation of Van Gogh’s letters to his brother Theo, and the correspondence between the pair was a source of immense interest to Bacon.  Amedee Ozenfant’s book Foundations of Modern Art first published in 1928 discusses philosophy, music and engineering among other diverse themes  accompanied by photographic illustrations of disparate subjects such as Greek and Egyptian art, pygmies, apes, distorted reflections in mirrors and machinery. This wide ranging and inclusive approach echoes Bacon’s own openness to artistic inspiration and combination of unusual sources. Of Louis le Brocquy Bacon said: “Louis le Brocquy belongs to a category of artists who have always existed - obsessed by figuration outside and on the other side of illustration - who are aware of the vast and potent possibilities of inventing ways by which fact and appearance can be reconjugated.” Among the twenty works of art initially selected by Bacon when he was invited to participate in the National Gallery, London’s series of artist curated shows The Artist’s Eye in 1985 were Manet’s Fragments of the Execution of Maximilian and Seurat’s The Bathers, Asnieres. In introducing his choices he remarked how writing or talking about painting was for him only an approximation as  ‘painting is its own language and is not translatable into words.’ In contrast it is the fragmentary poses and his unusual combining of art historical and other source material that provided an enduring and fascinating visual dialogue for the artist.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 01 Feb 2011 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 01 Feb 2011 00:00:00 +0000 Sun, 24 Apr 2011 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/exhibition_images/2011/mainitemimage_2294_documenta.jpg
Permanent Collection http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/215-permanent-collection http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/215-permanent-collection As a result of an ongoing collaboration with Sean Scully, who like Francis Bacon was born in Dublin, the gallery is honoured to be the recipient of a gift of seven paintings, promised since the mid-1990s and presented by the artist in 2006.  These paintings form the second permanent installation in a dedicated gallery in the new wing, located just off Gallery 12.  This gift from Sean Scully, a superb exponent of abstract art, provides a mainstay for the varied exponents of non-figurative painting in the collection; his practice is singular in its illumination of contemporary concerns in abstract expression.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 05 Jan 2011 16:34:15 +0000 Wed, 05 Jan 2011 16:34:15 +0000 Fri, 28 Jan 2011 16:34:18 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/4059_1985_guston_pcropped.jpg
Francis Bacon and Bullfighting http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/322-francis-bacon-and-bullfighting http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/322-francis-bacon-and-bullfighting During his visits to the South of France and to Spain, Francis Bacon would have had the opportunity of encountering the bullfight first hand. A significant number of loose leaves, books and postcards on bullfighting were found among the items in Francis Bacon’s studio including three copies of The Swords of Spain by Robert Daley. In the endpapers of one of these copies, Bacon wrote as an aide-memoire in the process of painting ‘14 July 1968 Studies from the Human Body and The Bullfight.’  In 1969 Bacon painted Study for Bullfight No. 1 and Second Version of Study for Bullfight No. 1. Two years previously  Bacon had included a bullfight in his painting Portrait of Isabel Rawsthorne Standing in a Street in Soho. Om view in the display cases of the Francis Bacon Studio from 21 September 2010.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 21 Sep 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 21 Sep 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 21 Sep 2010 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_2961_bc17cropped.jpg
Michael Hamburger by Tacita Dean http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/323-michael-hamburger-by-tacita-dean http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/323-michael-hamburger-by-tacita-dean Screening times: 11.00am and 3pm Tuesday - Saturday; Sunday 3pm
Commissioned to make a work in relation to the writer W.G. Sebald, Dean took as her subject the poet and translator Michael Hamburger whom Sebald meets in a chapter of his book, The Rings of Saturn. In her 28 minute film Dean concentrates on Hamburger's love of apples, while the rambling house, encroaching garden, sunlight, rattling wind and the appearance of a rainbow all act as a metaphor for the man as poet. This acquisition was generously funded by the Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism, 2008. On view until 7 November 2010.

 

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Thu, 22 Apr 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 22 Apr 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 22 Apr 2010 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_8161_2017_dean_tcropped.jpg
The Collection Revealed: The Perceptive Eye - Artists Observing Artists http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/135-the-collection-revealed-the-perceptive-eye-artists-observing-artists http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/135-the-collection-revealed-the-perceptive-eye-artists-observing-artists Curated by Jessica O'Donnell, Head of Collections

The Collection Revealed is an innovative new series begun in 2009 which encourages appreciation of, and participation in, modern and contemporary art as well offering the opportunity for highlighting new insights and research into the Gallery’s permanent collection. The Perceptive Eye: Artists Observing Artists is the third exhibition in this series drawn from the Collection of Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane. The Perceptive Eye will showcase rarely seen portraits of artists by artists, offering fascinating insights into how artists portray themselves and how they themselves are perceived. Paintings and works on paper by Edouard Manet, William Orpen, Sean Keating, Mary Swanzy, Henri Fantin-Latour, John Singer Sargent, Harry Clarke and Robert Ballagh, among other artists are included in this Collection Revealed show.  From Manet’s inclusion of himself and other artists in the ground breaking painting Music in the Tuileries Gardens to Francis Bacon’s final unfinished self portrait there is great diversity in subject, setting and style of the works on show. Harry Clarke’s wonderfully intense ink study of himself, for instance,  is an intriguing companion to his ‘hidden’ self portrait in the frieze of his stained glass masterpiece The Eve of St Agnes (Collection: Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane.) Not all of the works are self portraits.  Mary Swanzy’s painting of Sarah Purser and C.F. Daubigny’s portrait of Honore Daumier, for example, are records of great friendships and artistic solidarity.

Until 20 June 2010

A fully illustrated book The Collection Revealed: Artists Observing Artists is on sale in the Gallery Bookshop, tel. +353 1 8734216. ISBN 978-1-901702-36-1

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jodonnell.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Jessica O'Donnell) Tue, 13 Apr 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 13 Apr 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 13 Apr 2010 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/6254_702_keating_scropped.jpg
Francis Bacon and Street Life http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/324-francis-bacon-and-street-life http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/324-francis-bacon-and-street-life Pavements, gutters, streets and motor cards occur frequently in Bacon's work and are depicted with convincing realism. Francis Bacon's interest in photographs of street life is revealed by the large number of loose leaves and photography books on street life, particularly of London and Paris, that were found among the items in his Studio. These publications featured the work of well known photographers such as Eugene Atget, a street photographer hugely admired by the Surrealists, as well as general photographic surveys of city life showing ordinary people or children playing in the street. The anonymous, unposed photographic spontaneity of a city street in motion captured in books such as London: City of Any Dream, The Streets of East London and Dans les Rues de Paris had enormous potential to trigger compositional and figurative ideas for the artist.

On view in the Display Cases of the Francis Bacon Studio until 6 September 2010.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 16 Mar 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 16 Mar 2010 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 16 Mar 2010 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/1784_street.jpg
Francis Bacon: A Terrible Beauty http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/318-francis-bacon-a-terrible-beauty http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/318-francis-bacon-a-terrible-beauty Francis Bacon: A Terrible Beauty celebrates the centenary of Francis Bacon's birth in 63, Lower Baggot Street, Dublin. This exhibition comprising paintings, drawings, photographs, unfinished works and slashed canvases offers the viewer an astonishing new look at Francis Bacon, the great figurative painter of the 20th century. It provides an opportunity to reappraise his oeuvre through the selected paintings, several of which have not been on public exhibition for many years. The mastery of Francis Bacon is revealed through these works, supported by an extensive and previously unseen selection of items from Bacon’s Studio. Following on the donation of the Studio to the Hugh Lane by John Edwards in 1998, the 7,000 plus items retrieved from the studio were archived by The Hugh Lane. Francis Bacon’s Studio has been on permanent exhibition at Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane since 2001. It is acknowledged as one of the most pioneering and successful realisations of preserving and displaying an artist’s studio and contents. The database is unprecedented, documenting every item retrieved, thus providing fascinating insights into Bacon’s working processes. The exhibition is co-curated by Barbara Dawson and Martin Harrison. It is accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue that presents important new research on the artist. This is available from the gallery bookshop. Francis Bacon: A Terrible Beauty is one of the major European cultural events of 2009. The exhibition tours to Compton Verney, Warwickshire, England, from 27 March to 20 June 2010.Admission is free.The exhibition is supported by The Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism, Fáilte Ireland, The Irish Times and RTé Supporting the Arts.

Images (C) 2009 The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved / DACS, London

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 28 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 28 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 28 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_5543_hughlanegallerybaconcropped.jpg
The Collection Revealed: Cubism http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/319-the-collection-revealed-cubism http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/319-the-collection-revealed-cubism 11 June  - 20 September 2009

Curated by Jessica O'Donnell

In the second of  The Collection Revealed series, the Cubist-inspired works of Mainie Jellett, Evie Hone and May Guinness, artists who were at the vanguard of modernism in Ireland, will be shown alongside works by Albert Gleizes and Andre Lhote, both influential exponents of Cubism in France and with whom they studied in Paris.

A booklet has been produced with texts by Dr Roisin Kennedy, Jessica O'Donnell and Padraic E. Moore. On sale for 4 euros. Please contact 01 2225571 for further details.

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jodonnell.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Jessica O'Donnell) Thu, 11 Jun 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 11 Jun 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 11 Jun 2009 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_4328_1760_hone_ecropped.jpg
The Artist and His Oeuvre http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/315-the-artist-and-his-oeuvre http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/315-the-artist-and-his-oeuvre Reproductions of Francis Bacon’s own paintings lined the wall of his kitchen at 7 Reece Mews and many reproductions of his work including torn leaves from books, magazines and catalogues, as well as photographs were found among the items in his studio.

As well as offering the opportunity for continuously looking at previous compositions and subjects as important sources of inspiration, Bacon also on occasion over-painted these reproductions of his own finished paintings as another way of exploring and developing new compositional and pictorial ideas in his work.

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jodonnell.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Jessica O'Donnell) Tue, 28 Apr 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 28 Apr 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 28 Apr 2009 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/5025_f16-194.jpg
The Collection Revealed: Nathaniel Hone (1831-1917) http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/320-the-collection-revealed-nathaniel-hone-1831-1917 http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/320-the-collection-revealed-nathaniel-hone-1831-1917 Curated by Jessica O’Donnell

Over the coming months a series of spotlight exhibitions will offer an opportunity to take a closer look at the work of selected artists from the gallery’s prodigious permanent collection beginning with Nathaniel Hone in February 2009. The gallery’s conservation programme and lecture series will dovetail with this series of spotlight exhibitions from the collection.

Considered by Hugh Lane to be Ireland's greatest landscape painter, Nathaniel Hone was a prolific artist whose career included a prolonged period working in France, most notably at Barbizon where he came into contact with the the artists J.F. Millet, J.B.C. Corot and Henri Harpignies. Upon his return to Ireland in 1872 the countryside and seascapes around Malahide, where he lived, in north county Dublin became an enduring subject in his work and Evening, Malahide Sands c.1883 in the collection of Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane is widely regarded as one of his great works. The majority of the twelve paintings by Hone in the Hugh Lane Gallery's collection reveal Hone's facination with water, particularly the sea as well as ever changing light and weather conditions and are from the latter part of his artistic career.  A keen yachtsman, the great expanse of sea, waves, sky and clouds in his work are painted with vigour and energy and capture the wildness of the Atlantic ocean off County Clare and County Donegal as well as the North Sea off Lowestoft in England. On other occasions, such as with A Grey Day at Malahide, the mood of his landscapes and seacapes is more tranquil, still and reflective and tends to emphasis a more pastoral quality . In addition to painting in Ireland, Hone also made a number of works inspired by his travels abroad with his familiy around the Mediterranean, to Egypt and to Italy and two paintings View on the  Nile and Venice are also on view in Gallery Nine.

A full-colour illustrated booklet The Collection Revealed: Nathaniel Hone (1831-1917) with texts by Dr Julian Campbell, Jessica O'Donnell, Sarah Maisey and Kathryn Day Carrigan is on sale in the Gallery Bookshop.

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jodonnell.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Jessica O'Donnell) Tue, 24 Feb 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 24 Feb 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 24 Feb 2009 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_3843_209_hone_ncropped.jpg
Francis Bacon Studio Display Cases http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/321-francis-bacon-studio-display-cases http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/321-francis-bacon-studio-display-cases The work of pioneering photographer Eadweard Muybridge (1830–1904) was of crucial importance and of enormous interest to Francis Bacon. Muybridge
undertook extensive high-speed photographic studies of human and animal locomotion and showed in frieze frame stills how the human body and animal moves. Edgar Degas found Muybridge's photographs of horses very helpful for his modelling of thoroughbred horses, an exquisite example of which is in the
Hugh Lane's collection. Similarly Muybridge's photographs provided Bacon with an encyclopaedic range of poses from which to draw for the artist's increasingly ambitious figure painting.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Tue, 13 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 13 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 Tue, 13 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_9423_f16-221a.cropped.jpg
Francis Bacon Studio Display Cases: Illustrated Sporting Images http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/316-francis-bacon-studio-display-cases-illustrated-sporting-images http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/316-francis-bacon-studio-display-cases-illustrated-sporting-images Bacon sought visual matter on a constant basis and among the items found in the studio were large numbers of books, loose leaves, magazines and newspaper fragments. Rather than being interested in the subject per se, Bacon's curiosity about sport was for him another way of looking at and studying the human body in motion. The selected items on display include fragments, loose leaves and manipulated images of boxers, footballers, wrestlers and cricketers which provided Bacon with rich visual 'triggers' for his painted representation of the human figure. The images also reinforce and echo distinct visual preferences, poses and devices used continually by the artist.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Thu, 23 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 23 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 23 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/mainitemimage_6368_f105-62.cropped.jpg
Gallery Collection http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/314-gallery-collection http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/314-gallery-collection Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane houses the foremost collection of modern and contemporary art in Ireland. Established in 1908 by Sir Hugh Lane and his supporters with Dublin Corporation the collection has grown considerably with acquisitions  in both traditional art forms and new media. The gallery has benefited from significant bequests including Lady Lavery Memorial Bequest 1935, Francis Bacon's Studio 1998, Sean Scully Collection 2005 and gifts from including The Friends of the National Collections of Ireland, The contemporary Irish Arts Society as well as from individuals. The gallery's  collection is an invaluable reflection of movements and initiatives that have occurred from the time of the Impressionists to today including  superb works acquired from the ROSC series of exhibitions which occurred between 1967 and 1988. Recent acquisitions include Perceived Lightness by Liam Gillick, Black Atlas Series by Kathy Prendergast and Climate Shit Drawing by Yinka Shonibare  In 2008 the gallery celebrated its first centenary with Hugh Lane 100 Years exhibition which saw the return from National Gallery London all 39  paintings from Sir Hugh Lane's 1917 Bequest. They hung together together with the original collection for the first time since 1913. Over 80,000 people visited during the course of the exhibition.  In 2015 the gallery commemorated the centenary of the death of Sir Hugh Lane with the exhibition Sir Hugh Lane: Legacy and Loss. In 2016 as part of the commemorations for the centenary of the 1916 Rising, the gallery launched a themed programme Artist as Witness with selected displays from the collection. In 2017 the theme continues with Artist as Witness: Migrations which sees a display of works from the early 20th century to today.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Thu, 26 Jun 2008 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 26 Jun 2008 00:00:00 +0000 Thu, 26 Jun 2008 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_4745_3603.jpg
Recent Acquisitions 2005 - 2007 http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/317-recent-acquisitions-2005-2007 http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/317-recent-acquisitions-2005-2007 This is a showcase of key examples of Irish and international contemporary art practice aquired by Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane for its collection through purchases and donations. Works on view include Storm by Fergus Martin who explores a minimalist, post-conceptual work process that includes a universal self-enquiry, articulated through surfaces that initially appear calm but with further observation reveal the turbulences and restlessness of nature, particularly the sea.

Why It?s Time for The Imperial, Again by Gerard Byrne charts, through an installation of film and photography, the historic gap from what was luxurious and technologically advanced twenty years ago when the Chrysler Imperial was launched, to the fetishes of contemporary consumerism. Fieldcraft is a thought-provoking installation with drawings from the series life again. light again. leaf again. love again by Garret Phelan that resonates a universal concern with changing habitat and cultures and hybrid breeds that are emerging particularly in birdlife.Drawing equally on traditions of abstraction and figuration, Outskirts by Philip Guston was a bid to make palpable an inherent sense of existential doubt that the artist relied on throughout his career. Guston developed an iconography, which drew on his early life and the personal universe of his studio, to find meaning in the world. Outskirts was first shown in the Marlborough Gallery in the famously controversial show in 1970 when the artist returned to figuration. Black Relief over Yellow and Orange by Ellsworth Kelly, his first work in a public collection in Ireland, was selected from his exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in 2006. Untitled (Three figures) by Francis Bacon is one of six unfinished paintings by the artist in the collection. They are unique among his paintings on public display since they are incomplete and thus reveal his unorthodox techniques in their raw state.Other artists include Paul Seawright, Andrew Grassie, Seán Shanahan, Isabel Nolan, Jaki Irvine, Elizabeth Magill, Brian Maguire, Niamh O Malley, Noel Sheridan and Sean Scully.

Artist's Talk:Garrett Phelan Us and Them1.30pm Sunday 3rd February 2008 Garrett Phelan will discuss his work, fieldcraft and drawings from the Life again. Light again. Love again series which is part of the Recent Acquisitions 2005-2007 show. Garrett will discuss the inspiration for the production of this body of work that being "society's paradoxical relationship with nature"

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 21 Nov 2007 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 21 Nov 2007 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 21 Nov 2007 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/1039_phelan_crop.jpg
Francis Bacon Studio Display Cases: Art and Artists http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/313-francis-bacon-studio-display-cases-art-and-artists http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/313-francis-bacon-studio-display-cases-art-and-artists Like his commissioning photographs of friends which allowed him to paint at a distance from his subject, some of Bacon's most significant work was based on reproductions of work by other artists. He declared to being 'obsessed' with Velazquez's masterpiece Portrait of Pope Innocent X and many reproductions of this and other works by Velazquez, Michelangelo and Rembrandt were found among the items in his studio. Bacon played up the role that accident and chance had in his painting and, with reproductions of paintings scattered on the floor, he was receptive to radically new representative possibilities made as a result of reproductions being walked on or overpainted. In other instances his manipulation of the material by folding and creasing it was deliberate and intentional.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Fri, 23 Feb 2007 00:00:00 +0000 Fri, 23 Feb 2007 00:00:00 +0000 Fri, 23 Feb 2007 23:59:59 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/mainitemimage_646_f1-3cropped.jpg
Louis le Brocquy: Early Heroes Later Homage http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/312-louis-le-brocquy-early-heroes-later-homage http://www.hughlane.ie/whatson-collections/312-louis-le-brocquy-early-heroes-later-homage Louis le Brocquy and His Masters: Early Heroes Later Homage curated by Pierre le Brocquy and co-ordinated by Jessica O'Donnell. (14 February - 30 March 2007). Sponsored by ICON.

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mcappock.hughlane@dublincity.ie (Dr. Margarita Cappock) Wed, 14 Feb 2007 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 14 Feb 2007 00:00:00 +0000 Wed, 14 Feb 2007 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.hughlane.ie/images/collections/7350_lebrocquycropped.jpg